Grading & Reporting Schemes

In the past year, I’ve heard from many teachers in different situations looking to move towards Proficiency-Based Grading (PBG). Elsewhere on this blog, I’ve written very long explanations about grading practices. Here are various grading scheme options presented in a straight-forward manner. If you’re in a situation that seems very different from those listed below, comment and we’ll think of something!

Fully-PBG
100% – Proficiency (using this one rubric, these simple rubrics, or these detailed rubrics)
0% – DEA, Quick Quizzes, or anything else your little heart desires
Use this scheme if you have complete control, want maximum freedom, and can still manage class without DEA being included in the grade.

Variable-PBG **Added 6.19.2016**
0% to 100% – Proficiency (increasing weight throughout the year)
100% to 0%DEA (decreasing weight throughout the year)
0% – Quick Quizzes, etc.
Use this scheme to emphasize the importance of DEA, and really establish those routines that lead to acquisition in the classroom. Read about that here.

Mostly-PBG (if you use this, be sure to set the maximum Proficiency grade at 90, not 100)
90% – Proficiency (using these rubrics with DEA, with an option to copy the fewer indicators from these simple rubrics)
10% – DEA
0% – Quick Quizzes, etc.
Use this scheme if you have snarky DAPS (Department, Admin, Parents, Students) who are troubled by not having numbers between the tens (i.e. “Mr. P, an 85 won’t do, little Jenny needs to stand out amongst her peers with an 87, and little Johnny surely is a 96, not 95, right?”).

Tempered-PBG
50% – Proficiency (using these rubrics with DEA, with an option to copy the fewer indicators from these simple rubrics)
50% – DEA
0% – Quick Quizzes, etc.
Use this scheme if you have students (damaged by their educational system) who only agree to do something “if it counts.” You could also end up with something between Mostly- and Tempered-PBG by adjusting the percentages.

Mixed-PBG (read this post for one of those detailed explanations)
35% – Listening & Reading Proficiency (using these rubrics with DEA, but modify with only Listen/Reading indicators)
15% – Writing & Speaking Proficiency (using these rubrics with DEA, but modify with only Writing/Speaking indicators)
25% – DEA
15% – Knowledge (Linguistics/Vocabulary/Cultural Facts)
10% – Knowledge (Linguistics/Vocabulary/Cultural Facts) Tests
0% – Quick Quizzes, etc.
Use this scheme if you have to work within an established department grading scheme, but have some control over renaming the categories. If you have very, very little freedom, allot as much as possible to Proficiency getting as creative as you can within the grading categories you must use (e.g. like splitting Proficiency into several categories based on skill). This is probably the toughest spot to be in, but comment with your parameters and we’ll get creative, but not too creative.

Skill-Based-Mixed **Added 9.19.2016**
(read this post for one of those detailed explanations)
25% – Reading (these simple rubrics with only the understand indicator by removing “hear”)
25% – Listening (these simple rubrics with only the understand indicator by removing “read”)
25% – Writing (these simple rubrics with only the understood indicator)
20% – Speaking (these simple rubrics with only the understood indicator)
5% – Knowledge Test (Linguistics/Vocabulary/Cultural Facts), like Midterm, etc.
0% – Quick Quizzes, etc.
Use this scheme if your department is skill-based, you can’t include DEA.

Other Curiosities

Summative/Formative Policies
Read this post on a way to navigate this absurd mandate that has nothing to do with language acquisition. A simple semantic distinction could help you out.

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3 thoughts on “Grading & Reporting Schemes

  1. Pingback: A New Grading System: The last one you’ll ever need (once you’re ready) | Magister P.

  2. Pingback: Grading Scheme: DEA & Proficiency | Magister P.

  3. Pingback: 2016-17 DEA | Magister P.

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