CI Curriculum

The bad news; there isn’t one for Latin. The good news; we do have a list of Most Important Latin Verbs. More bad news; most teachers new to CI don’t know what to DO with the list, yet this is what they crave, and NEED the most. It makes perfect sense. There just isn’t time to create a realistic curriculum from the ground up, or tons of Embedded Readings while we’re just getting used to the idea of CI from reading blogs, articles, and research, let alone honing our craft when it comes to delivering understandable messages.

The role of a curriculum changes when a skilled CI teacher is able to use more student details to drive content, and can create teachable moments ex tempore. There’s also the case for non-targeted input which leaves a curriculum optional. STILL, all that’s advanced stuff, and this is about getting teachers help who crave it most.

Some support.

Although I’ve heard recently that some teachers have ditched TPR at the start of the year in favour of beginning storytelling immediately, I will continue to start with TPR since I really haven’t exhausted the possibilities. There’s an updated, or “evolved” version of TPR anyway, which I find is more powerful and I’d like to get some experience with that.

So, I’ve been working on an essential list of classroom vocab (remember, “shelter vocab, unshelter grammar!”) to use with the most important verbs…about the closest thing to the high-demand curriculum that’s needed.

Access the TPR Word Wall here.

 Update 10.08.15 DO NOT attempt to work through the TPR Word Wall as a curriculum to complete. Like EVERYTHING we teach, when something loses steam, move on. My pattern has been to work on a verb or two, then get some details from a student with DISCIPVLVS ILLVSTRIS, and read, give a dictātiō, etc. For reference, I am just past the 8 hr mark with my (online) classes, and haven’t begun storytelling.

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3 thoughts on “CI Curriculum

  1. Thank you for sharing this! This will be a big help in teaching Latin I with CI for the first time this year. How much time would you generally spend on this core group of words until most all of the students are ready to move on?

    • The correct answer is to focus on words “until they know them.” That’s unhelpful for planning, I understand, but the alternative we are used to leads to the idea of “covering” this material. These words are so frequent that they should keep popping up anyway. I can say with confidence that the TPR portion of the school year is going to run a natural course. You may find yourself half way through this list after the first month (~15 class hours) and then all of a sudden interest dwindles. This is bad news, since we need to be delivering compelling messages. Once that happens, move onto more Storyasking, or MovieTalk, and sneak the rest of this list bit by bit into subsequent lessons the entire year.

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